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. >>> fueled by a weaker yen and strong sales of cameras in the u.s. >>> and shares in virgin media rally after an offer for a takeover that could value the uk cable operator at $20 billion. >> all right. welcome to tuesday. >> it's get together tuesday. coordinated, as well. >> the final print for the eurozone is finally come in, 48.6, a little better than the forecast of 48.2. >> may i just say, though, the employment index, look at that, 46.1, which is just barely better than the flash estimate but still the lowest since december 2009. on a downward trajectory. it's not germany where the final composite was 54.4. it's the periphery still. france's final january pmi falls to 46.1. >> france is where the concern is. we have francois hollande today speaking to the eu parliament. he's going to lay out his vision for the eu against that economic back drop. >> isn't it amazing? we come into the week yesterday with everyone still talking. you have that great barons cover, you come in, just get the risk trade massively off. and the question for today and the rest of the week is frankly whether that'
thought was good for us all. i am honored to be here with american enterprise institute and for me it's like coming to the mac and the promised land and certainly we recognize the great contributions that the american enterprise is given over many years in helping us with the development of policy and understanding of what's taking place particularly here in washington d. c., so thanks for the invitation to come here and speak. we are going to talk about health care today and from a utah perspective, my view of the world when it comes to health care. it's a complicated topic and it's certainly an important topic and i know health care has been on the lips of many, the watercooler topic that it may be. i have heard the story of the four country surgeons in utah talking about health care issue and they got into the conversation of who is the easiest person to operate on? and the one doctor says i can tell you the easiest people to operate on a really mathematicians. when asked why mathematicians come to when you open them up and take them apart all of their parts are numbered so it's ve
can tweet us. we have 35, is already on facebook. and you can always e-mail us at urnal@cspan.org legislators step up for paid sick leave. some pretty 9% of private-sector workers are not entitled to paid time off when they fall ill according to the bureau of labor statistics. low-wage and part-time workers, particularly those who work at small firms or who work in restaurants, are among the least likely to get paid sixth time. to change that, democratic lawmakers and their allies in maryland, washington, and massachusetts, and cities including new york, philadelphia, and portland, or try to advance measures that would make a sixth time a legal requirement for most firms. in congress, senator tom harkin plans to reintroduce a federal paid sick leave bill this spring. some employers contend the measure has harmed workers with company wage and increase -- which by prompting cuts in wages or increases. we are asking you about the federal government and if there should be a federal mandate when it comes to paid sick days. here is how you can reach out to us, on our phone lin
be little threat to human health. our correspondent, joining us from our parliamentary to you. we have politicians across is that going to be enough to clear this up? th>> these tests should certainy go some way in making consumers feel more confident about the meat products they are buying throughout the european union. ironically, two weeks ago, the british food safety association started testing for chemicals in horse meat sparked by this mixup of beef and horse meat scandal and promptly found traces of chemicals, including those mentioned in the report, which was typically used in resources. this unearthed a completely different scandal, and at the same time showed that the effectiveness of tests is rather limited because that the tested positive and was then exported to france where it might have entered the human food chain. the city will make testing faster but also said that limits were increasingly seeing that it might be a case of europe-wide fraud, so it might soon not be a question of food safety but on how to tackle criminality. >> the question does remain -- how could it
. >> and is steady as she goes, the u.s. economy is expected to keep up the recent trend of modesty of unspectacular job growth in january. >>> plus, the dutch finance minister warns of a worsening deficit this year, this after the government is forced to bail out local banks after a bailout of 3.7 million euros. >>> we kick off with the pmis out of the eurozone. january manufacturing pmi, 47.9. the flash 47.5, december manufacturing pmi was 46.1. it has boosted the euro to maintain its gaze, now back over to 1.3651 and continuing to climb high. that is now a 32-month high against the yen, as well, at 11.25965. the german manufacturing pmi was a little better, as well, this morning. helping to boost those numbers. we suggest that there's benefits from emerging markets rather than, perhaps, from elsewhere in europe. anyway, coming in better once again for the eurozone. still in contraction territory, but, of course, the trend is what is being concentrated on. we had similar indicators for two die verging views on china's recovery. eases to 50.4 for january, that was below the forecast of 5079 the. bu
joins us again this morning. steve, we actually finally start the meetings today. we've had comments out from the russian finance minister, as well. what's he saying? >> well, he's trying to get us back on track on to a growth agenda, which when you look back at what the agenda was a couple of meetings ago back in toronto in 2010, that was sorely missing. that was about harboring deficits and having firm targets. it hasn't really worked, has it? what they've said is our growth estimates were slightly optimistic. listening to what some of the policymakers are saying this time around, the likes of mario draghi, i'm scratching my head a little bit. there's some uncontentious stuff. i can live with that. range of financial market indicators showing situation normalizing. but what about this bit? currency chatter is inappropriate, fruitless and self-defeating. hang on a second, mr. draghi. it wasn't us, the journalists that started this. it was policymakers. it was the g- 7. it's incestble we're going to start rumbling about this. i can't help but thinking mr. draghi is missing the point here
westgate is away but we'll do our best without him. we have michael brown to help us through things. coming up on the program, we'll head out to hong kong where china is requiring a reinstruct during of the economy. >>> after that, of course, the super bowl wasn't just one of the on biggest sporting events of the year, it was one of the biggest days of the year for madison avenue. we'll take a look at which ads were touchdowns and were ads were fumbles. >> mariana rajoy meets angela merkel. >>> plus, upcoming elections that sylvia berlusconi has called his last great electoral and political battle. >>> the power to split up uk banks if they fail to -- activity. george osborne is expected to give the bank of england the responsibility to make sure banks are involved in these activities. you have to love the extended analogy. watch the george osborne speech live here at 10:30 local for those of you here with us in the uk. in the meantime, there are more charges at the top over at barclay's. last night, the bank's financial chief and financial chief announced their leaving. tomorrow, barclay's
>>> they want to snow why another crew locked onto a helicopter. japanese and u.s. officials are urging the chinese to ensure such accidents don't happen again. a chinese navy aimed at a helicopter in mid-january. japa controls the islands. china and taiwan claim them. >> translator: it's extremely regrettable that such a unilateral provocative action has been taken. we will strongly urge the chinese to exercise restraint and not make the situation any worse. >> a spokesperson said she learned about the incident through the media. japanese government officials say the chinese are trying to give the impression they're not behind the incidents. >>> the u.s. defense secretary says it could have had grave consequences. l leon panetta says it could inflame intentions. >> they have to be part of family of nations in that region working gether. >> panetta said the united states, south korea and japan will do everything possible to ensure their territories are secu secure. he called on china to avoid antagonizing other nations. the former secretary of state said u.s. officials oppose
liesman. also at the table with us this morning, our guest host is andy surel. andrew just talked about the markets. stocks ending at session lows yesterday. in fact, all ten s&p sectors closed lower. yet the bulls betting this is nothing more than a bull pac. but we will have a number of powerful investors for their thoughts throughout yao the morning. jim o'neill will join us in just a few minutes. then in the next half hour, the man charged with making sdigs for how blackrock invests more than $1 trillion, the firm's chief investment strategist, russ koesterich. nouriel roubini will be joining us and we're going to ask him for his current view of the world. in the following hour, buy and hold is the name of his game, barons capital ceo ron baron will be our special guess. he's been talking to us about how great of an opportunity stocks have been. we'll see if he's still feeling that optimistic now that stocks have reached 14,000 or close to it. >>> how majority leader eric cantor is set to address a major policy issue today. the goal here is trying to rebrand the gop. moving on, befo
are paying them. i can't believe we can't use the marines in these situations. someone has got to do a cost benefit analysis. can you imagine the amount of money we have spent fooling around with these contractors that weren't getting the job done? can you imagine the time we have spent on this and the money that has been spent? i would like for you, general, to talk about the cost benefit of putting marines in our embassies and why in the world this is hard for us to get our arms around and where is the analysis that shows us we are saving any money. >> just to react briefly to what would be necessarily a much longer conversation. the marines are not -- that's not their role or what they do for the nation. could it be at some point potentially? i would hate to think we would make that decision based on costs but it would require a longer conversation. >> i guess my point is god forbid we have something happen in kabul. this would look like child's play if you look at the history of what's gone on in terms of the guard force at kabul. and you know, i want to be to rt would be necessarily a
, this was very important for us to stay in positive risk environment. >> hans, we're seeing the response to the upside now. second highs, 1.32. are you sticking by your thoughts that it is still heading towards 1.30? >> we have to make it clear that in the next quarter or two the euro has upside potential and not downside potential. then the longer prospect for the euro is still very swb very negative. why is this euro overshoot taking place? it has a lot to do with the increasing negative correlation with the yen. so the euro is the anti-yen. that implies that when we were seeing the yen coming under selling pressure, japanese investors, where are they currently investing? investors are investing in fixed income. in many cases, very little yields left so that actually means the peripheral of europe sticks out. you need to have some preconditions. the most important, the yen has to stay weak, but secondly we should not run into any politically motivated problem with the euro. that would be a killer for that type of trade. >> and on that note, the european commission today is due to relea
is cleared for takeoff. reports say the boards at amr and us airways sign off on their $11 billion deal to create the world's biggest airline. >> announcer: you're watching "worldwide exchange," bringing you business news from around the world. >> all right. you're wearing an appropriate valentine's day shirt. >> i am. i tried. there's a little bit of pink if we look at your tie very closely. if you want to know what's happening in the markets today, hold on, ubs, the valentine's day gdp's massacre. >> yes. >> because if you look at when it's japan shrinking at an annualized rate, germany coming in on quarter on quarter, france coming in -- well, we know they had a recession earlier in the year, as well. minus 0.9% on the quarter been minus 2.7 on the year. >> oh, that's brutal. >> it's the sixth consecutive contraction and that match tess recession of 1992 to 1993. the minus 0.9, it was forecast at minus 0.6 is the slash gdp. >> and italy has been down 2.7% on the year, but this is something in the range of almost a 4% annualized drop until the year from a year earlier. >> the massacre
in london or certainly in the u.s. they wouldn't mind seeing at this point. >> we've created a million private sector jobs. >> in britain? >> yeah. >> well, congratulations. >> there you go. that is the great conundrum, right? >> it's true. the different between -- well, and even with germany. the liesh market social security holding up, despite the sharp contraction in the fourth quarter. although this will probably add to the sense that the german economy bottomed during that period. >> did i see any -- i haven't seen any, no. i think that's out a little later. plenty to get through on today's program. >> it's good to be back, by the way. >> biggest take away from the mobile world congress? what's the one thing you saw that you thought, oh, that is really cool. >> i go to a conference like this and i think, machine res taking over the world. >> that's the thing we talk about. i don't like those machine peps. >> exactly. so 50 billion connected-m devic. that's a figure thatjs -- some y the point is, it isn't just about you and i talking to each other on a mobile phone. we are well bey
of 87 of 75 against the euro, as well. darren maher joins us. there's been quite a big move already in sterling before this announcement, one wonders actually whether the ratings downgrade, now it's on a stable outlook, is perhaps the end of the weakness in sterling. >> i suspect not, to be honest. we can talk about it being a move and certainly over the last couple of years, there has been a big shift in cable. frankly, this has been a relatively small move. we can't say as of yet it's overshoot. i don't think the market will take great solace that we're now in a stable outlook from moody's because i think everybody recognizes the uk is still fragile and the growth position is more fragile, so i think more down side is possible. >> but what is in the price, darren? >> i think from this point forward is how much slippage do we get. i would say it's more what's in the price and what's in the price for sterling is the market has given the uk a lot of good will that it will be able to mix this wonderful growth of austerity. i think what the market is now doing is reappraising that. tha
the tax code which everybody wants us to do. but also we have used a small percentage of that money to reduce the deficit. so it doesn't place too much burden on the operating structure of the country. >> so who is the one person in the white house and one person and the republican leadership who is most committed to making the tough choice because i think the one person in the white house is most authentically -- authentically committed to making is the president. i've met with him several times. i believe that he's willing to make these cuts in the entitlement programs that we have to make. that doesn't mean i don't want to continue to push them outside of his comfort zone to go a little further than you might want to go otherwise, but i think we're going to have to if we get a deal with republicans but again we'll have to push the republicans in order to do the tax reform, allows us to reduce the deficit in the same manner. >> how do you push a president? >> you know, the way i've done it is always candidly, open with him, not agree but tell them exactly what you think and why. t
. following the consequences of the drought last year, the president directed us to create a drought task force, made up of all federal agencies, to try to mitigate the impacts and effects of drought. that led us to begin thinking at usda about steps we can take to help producers during a difficult time. we took a series of steps to try to mitigate the consequences. we opened up crp land, and changed premium payments, things of that nation -- that nature. it also got us thinking -- were there other steps, other things we should be doing, to provide help and assistance? it occurred to us perhaps we should be focused more acutely on the need to encourage multi- cropping through the united states, in order for us to do a better job of conservation, to create biomass that could be a revenue source, and to potentially allow us to conserve precious water resources, which would in turn allow us to get through these drought circumstances in a more favorable circumstance. we have begun a process of looking at ways in which we could provide assistance. you will be fortunate to hear from a fellow by
use only might accumulated leave time for this birth, and i made arrangements to have the child adopted at birth. pregnancy was immoral and administrative grounds for discharge, and that was that. so susan was sent back to the west coast where she was represented by the aclu of the state of washington. they managed to stay or discard -- to stay for discharge month by month. she lost in district court. she lost in the ninth circuit, but with an excellent defense. [laughter] the supreme court took her case, and they then -- and then the solicitor general been the dean of the first law school i attended, he saw a real damage potential for the government in susan's case. so he convened the military brass and he said, that rule about pregnancy being an automatic grounds for discharge, that's not right for our time. you should immediately wave the captain's discharge and then change the regulation. for the future. and that's what happened. now, the law students know what that meant for our case. the government had given susan everything she was asking for, so the government then immed
. >> it is because television. >> hold it eleanor. >> the spectacle has lost a lot of the drama and dignity it used to have. he walks down that aisle and gets slaps and high fives. they should have had beyonce doing her number midway through it. >> every other president has walked down that aisle and i don't recall you complaining about it. >> it has lost dignity. >> ike and fdr didn't look like that. >> it is an american tradition and the fact the numbers were down is partly because people don't watch television like they used to. >> eleanor, how were obama's kneels son ratings -- neilsen ratings, the second lowest since they began taking measurement in 1993. the lowest since 2000 when bill you clinton's last drew an audience of 931.5 million. >> i think neilsen should start rating some of the social media sites and look at the exchanges between people who watched it. the american people who watched that and pick up portions that have, here our president is addressing concerns in their lives. i agree the big topics like the eu trade pac that is very important. but i don't think people in the count
to be a challenge for us. at the end of the day for us in utah and other states that are struggling, how has our approach to health care reform and operate in an a.c.a. world, how do we fit in with the law of the land? our exchange, we have named it avenue h and it's not for avenue herbert, but the difference between the federal exchange -- we talk about the exchanges that have taken on a negative contation. an ability to facilitate people's choices is a good idea. our exchange are those different from those envisioned by the a.c.a. we focus on small business, working through them to provide access to their employees on an individual business, but through the business community and get people enrolled in private insurance. our exchange, interestingly enough, only has five employees. the total costs for what we do on an annual basis is $600,000 a year. we aren't spending a lot of money on this process. so we have the ability to expand. but we have an administrative process, which means we let the market make the decisions. we facilitate opportunities and that's all that we do. by contrast, the a.
's will close its structured capital markets business and focus on investing in britain, u.s. and africa. they also posted earnings for 2012, down 6 million pounds versus 5 million last year due to a reduction in the value of the bank's debt along with situation payments for the selling of financial products. barclay's rate dividend to 6.5 shares for 2013 is off to a fairly roam start. joining us first is oliver ralph, financial times lex writer. oliver, thank you so much, indeed, for joining us. what do you make for what you've heard from anthony jenkins this morning? they're obviously trying to say it's going to take time, we're trying to restore our reputation. is it the right thing? >> yeah, it is the right thing. they've launched the business. the core of the bank remains the same. london investment bank and new york investment bank. the core of the bank remains the same. they're making changes around the area and the core of it is as it was. >> talk about the investment bank in particular. this has been the place where not just barclay's, but a lot of the competitors, too, try and
from her later in the show. >>> and taking the positive u.s. housing numbers from the nhab numbers. we'll be in new york with analysis at 11:45 cet. >> the italian election race is heating up. there is less than a week before voters head to the polls. comedian turns politician beppe grillo, in fact, is owes closing in on sylvia berlusconi for second place. official polls can no longer be published. the private polls seen by reuter s suggest mario monti may, in fact b with be something of a spoiler. >> and the election largely coming down to five key candidates. the front-runner is bersani. he's the leader of the center left pd party, calling for growth measures alongside monte's plan. sylvia berlusconi is threatening to make a political comeback despite corruption scandals. we've mentioned the comedian beppe grillo. at the same time, the former caretaker mario monti, he's been struggling to gain ground in his first ever political campaign. and then last, not necessarily least, there's the civil revolution leader and former public prosecutor antonio ingrola. >> only in italian politics.
at 9:30 eastern, the us- india relations at the carnegie endowment for international peace. and they look at sequestration, and automatic spending cuts set to go into effect march 1 that will affect federal workers. that is a 2 --- that is at 2:30 p.m. eastern. >> from the start, we told the board that the approach we were going to take, pretty straightforward. remember, we were set -- sent there to fix gm. that was the mission. go make this thing a viable company again. so we were all focused, and brought the message we are going to design, build, and sell the world's best vehicles. we are going to move quickly, we need your support, your input, and so we changed a few things about the board meeting. we shortened them considerably. we stayed away from the details or did not get in the weeds on how you build a car, but the bigger questions of financing, more out, positioning, marketing, that sort of thing. the board was very supportive of that, and we kept them informed. you know, we just took off. >> leading general motors through bankruptcy and the government bailout, for
of mergers to talk about. nicole: the first is in airline deal. it was highly anticipated that u.s. airways and american airlines would merge. first let's hit heinz. i am going to stick with heinz. warren buffett, berkshire hathaway. obviously at a premium. heinz is up 20%. watch the 3:00 p.m. show, we will certainly delve into it more for you. he loves their products. he loves the emerging markets. he thinks it was a great buy. then, we will talk about u.s. airways and american airlines merger. you can see they are finally coming together. the u.s. airways ceo will remain in the top spot as ceo. u.s. airways is down right now. dagen: thank you, nicole. connell: we are waiting for the speaker of the house, john boehner. we say take a look at this. a little over two weeks until automatic spending cuts will kick in. congress taking a week off leaving you just six working days to get something done. dagen: wait until the last minute has become the norm. how do you think this plays out? >> i think the impact on the economy will be small. the cuts are relatively small. we had $175 billion in tax
of the fact that was used to talk about the king is the fact that he was preventing people from coming to the country and being able to migrate here kyl and then if we look at the statue of liberty to give me your tired in your poor what i don't want people to take away from this hearing is all of a sudden we forgot about the tide of the poor and the people that are striving for a better life, so those are probably my biggest concerns when we what that he the president we sat and we have economic problems and we are getting out of them like we always do we and we will always prospered because we are resilient. but the question becomes what about the moral ground that we would see if we just said we are going to get about 11 million people and we are only going to focus on skilled workers we are not going to take care of this house and equal protection do you worry about that? >> i do. the fifth thing is our country is in a mess. we have a brain drain but not for the first time in history. it's never happened before. america has been a land. it is happening right now. if we wait to fix
you all for joining us here today and thank you all who joined us. [applause] >> in a few moments, secretary of state john kerry gives an address at the university of virginia. in an hour, a defense -- department of defense briefing on sequestration. after that, it review of the 2012 presidential campaign with strategists from president obama and mitt romney. secretary of state john kerry is calling on congress not to make senseless reductions in foreign aid to automatic spending cuts scheduled to begin march 1. the secretary spoke at the university of virginia in charlottesville. he was introduced by virginia senator tim kaine. this is an hour. [applause] >> thank you very much. thank you so much. hello, uva. it is great to be back on the grounds. i want to say to president sullivan what a treat it is to be here with you. thank you for hosting this great occasion. to my friend robert hurt, served with him in state government and now we travel to washington together. i look forward to good work together, especially if on this occasion to introduce secretary kerry and to introduce
meeting. they're due out later this afternoon in the u.s. will the fomc offer clues on an end to qe3? we're joined at 11:30 to weigh in. >>> with india's government clouded in corruption allegations, we'll speak to one of the country's wealthiest individuals and what it means for business. billionaire udai kotak joins us in 20 minutes' time. >>> plenty coming up including sony which is heading to the bill apple for a major on, national endowment. will the game console giant take the wraps off its rumored playstation? expert analysis at 11:20 cet. >>> and bhb bulletin has posted a steep fall in earnings for the first time in the year. the australian mining giant announced change at the top after the 43% drop in profit. we have more on this report from sydney. >> reporter: the surprise at bhp, billiton's ceo mariu marius kloppers announcement coming earlier than expected. >> coincided today with a weaker pricing environment. but two totally unrelated events. >> reporter: he will be replaced by andrew mckenzie, current head of bhp's middles division. he's well regarded in the industry and s
correspondence sent us this summary of tuesday's trading from the frankfurt stock exchange -- our correspondent said us this summer. >> some shares were strongly in demand while others found themselves deeply on the downside. some of the tightening rules might make strong banks even stronger, and that banks could profit which have many corporate clients and many international clients. stock market in general this tuesday managed to recover somewhat from the losses of the beginning of the week, also due to positive economic data. the german engineering sector managed to post a significant increase of factory orders again. >> a look now at the raw numbers from the markets. the dax ended the day of a bit, more than 0.3%. euro stoxx 50 rose nearly a full percentage point. the dow jones is up 0.87%, and the euro is trading against the dollar at $1.3579. >> the u.s. justice department is suing standard and poor's for its alleged role in the 2008 financial crisis. wall street investors say they were expecting the move. in 2007, the ratings agency made its fortune by giving high credit ratings to worth
's different? we have seen an enormous increase in the u.s. trade deficit, especially with countries like china. today, they happened to release a report that looked at the effect of currency manipulation, perhaps the single most important factor and explain the growth of our trade deficit. eliminating the trade deficit or eliminating currency manipulation could reduce the trade as a by roughly $190-$490 billion. doing this would increase manufacturing employment by up to 1 million jobs. that's a big downpayments in the whole we have created in manufacturing and employment. one thing we need to do is create demand. that is what we did do but we did not do that in the last decade. we need to shift the demand to domestic produced goods resulting in the hiring of domestic workers. manufacturing jobs are amongst the best for workers especially for those without a college degree. high wages, good benefits. >> bruce, you worked in washington, d.c., and brookings is right off dupont. >> i am mostly on a plane. >> industrial policy is a dirty word. if you go to any other domestic place, it will land yo
>> let's talk about recent comments in canada, the u.s. ambassador to canada and find that more action by canada on climate change might make it easier for the president to approve keystone. how did you interpret those comments? >> i think it was another opportunity to talk about what we are doing. i believe for the president and for canada, it is both. you can actually improve energy security and in our neighborhood of north america and with vehicle emissions standards, coal plants standards, you will eventually see that in the united states. nobody is replacing a coal plant with coal again. they are replacing it with natural gas. it reduces emissions by 50%. i did not see that as a quid pro quo. when the secretary of state and our minister of foreign affairs met and had a press conference, they talked about both climate change and energy security. we talked about vehicle emissions standards. th minister talked about the action we've taken had the the united states on coal plants in canada. i closed down some coal plants. i thought it was good for our jurisdiction but i think e
satellites. stay with us. we will find out if this is something we all should be worried about. stay with us. jamie is here on planet earth with all the business news. the g-20 ministers are meeting on this weekend to talk about the currency wars. >> it is very important. it's all about devaluing. the reason why people get upset about it countries devouring their currency is everybody cannot do it. you cannot all duo it. >> has the concern and prompted by japan? quests, yes, japan is devalued by 20%. the g-20 group of nations is meeting in moscow. there's no doubt this will be on top of the agenda. accusations have been flying that certain developed economies have been trying to devalue their currencies inboost their e their struggling economies a boost. japan has been cast as the chief >> the winner in this scenario would be the country that gets the weakest exchange rate because they would have a competitive advantage and able to export more, so that would create more jobs. bringies want to themselves advantage. >> there's been more bad news for british retailers. sales in january down aga
will use super bowl sunday to talk about government regulations when it comes to the issue of steroids or head injuries. the phone lines are open. let's begin with a look at some of the headlines courtesy of the museum. from "the san francisco chronicle" -- from "the baltimore sun" -- let's turn to the politics and policy behind the nfl. this is a story a few days ago from "the washington post." outlining a plan and a letter to the executive director of the players union. they agreed as part of a 2011 collective bargaining agreement that the players should be tested for hgh, but the two sides of that agreed. two seasons have been played without it. last weekend in new orleans, roger goodell was asked a number of questions including one on the issue of head injuries. here is more from last week. [video clip] >> i welcome the president's comments. we want to make sure people understand what we are doing to make our game safer, not just in the nfl but throughout sports. the changes we are making a in the nfl are changing all of sports. it is a better recognition of head injuries. of treat
're seeing red arrows on the board. most notably the euro hitting a one-week low against the u.s. dollar. in asia, china up eighth straight session. nikkei highest level since september of 2008. disney set to open at record highs. strength in media networks. word that it's planning films based on "star wars" characters. >>> zynga, revenues continue to fall and the social gaming company said 2013 would be profitable. >>> company seeing momentum in america's improvement in europe and big margin gains for 2013 for ralph lauren. >>> the post office could be eliminating or cutting back deliveries on saturday. we'll explain. they carry the official announcement at 10:00 a.m. this morning. >>> we start with disney. shares rising pre-market, set to open at all-time highs at fiscal fourth quarter profits beat the markets. growing attendance at the theme parks. real news came during bob iger's interview with our own julia boorstin. >> in fact, we are working on a few stand-alone films. larry kazden and simon ginberg are working on films derived on "star wars" characters that are not part of the ov
that are indispensable not just for the beneficiary countries, but for europe as a whole. with all of us would benefit in terms of growth. cultural is another common policy which enables us to boost agriculture industry which is precious to the european union. but which also must be respectful of the environment. and that's why world development will complement that. not offsetting these two policies against one another. that will be easy to do. we must keep the pedestal of european policies because otherwise how can we go from the? my second principle is that the budget, the financial framework which is to be proposed must continue the growth partner we adopted in june of this year. last year. now, that means that we must promote innovatioinnovatio n, infrastructure, new energy, new forms of energy because there will be no consistency is in june we were to set out a roadmap and then we're have a deflationary pack and the fall of the european financial framework. my third principle is that the budget must support the most vulnerable of europeans, those most exposed to the crisis, the poorest of the po
uses his state of the union speech to urge congress to end the battle over the budget and work together to boost the u.s. economy and help the middle class. >> together we have cleared away the rubble of crisis. we can say with renewed confidence that the state of our union is strong. >>> there we go. >> who doesn't love to kick off a wednesday morning with the iea monthly oil report? >> they have lowered their oil demand growth expectations on weaker gdp forecasts. demand growth, 840,000 barrels a day in 2013. they've cut the forecast for opec crude to 29.8 million barrels a day. they say oil supply will hit a 12-month low in january. >> can we show crude and look at the reaction there? we'll take a look in one second. what else are they saying in this report? >> they say the non-opec supply will be rising. opec supply will be falling. non-opec supply is rising, one million barrels a day this year. then they talk about iran oil production hovering below the lowest in 30 years. new sanctions could see further declines in iranian output. they say the sanctions are costing around $40 bill
markets, as well. this is where we stand in the u.s. spanish yields higher, 5.31%. interestingly enough, we look ahead to mr. person unanimousky to give treasuries. gilt yield 2.018% is where we stand at the moment. giving support because of the risk off caused by those italian elections. euro/dollar, that's been down to 1.3039. that's the seven-week low, january 10th we hit that. dollar/yen, what a wild day yesterday for dollar/yep. we hit a 33-month high for dollar against the yen, 94.77. then we fell down to 90.85 at the moment. 91.94. aussie/dollar still weak. sterling/dollar, we're spinninged in at this low, 1.5166. selling has bounced back as you might expect against the euro. the italian election yesterday caused gold to spike up to around 1600. just below it at the moment at 1598. brent continues to weaken below 114 and nymex a little weaker at 92.32. that's where we stand in reaction to the after markets here to the italian elections. let's get more reaction on the asian markets with sixuan. >> thank you, ross. asian markets fell sd as the political stalemate in italy was felt
political parties and civic groups because at least in theory parties are more accountable and tend to use their money to help challenges and are less inclined to support extremist, which is no small matter in today's polarized environment. here we go. thank you. here are some trends i see and how citizen as united plays into them. it did not cause them but it greases the wheels, especially since 2000 to when congress passed the bi-partisan campaign reform act. there is a redistribution of money away from can't attend -- candidates and toward groups. candidates are chiefly responsible but more is spent by others and for a while was political parties but it is non-party groups and citizens united cracked up this dynamic. -- ratches up this dynamic. there are strong incentives for collective action by partisans. national politics today is about high-stakes elections. both parties have a chance to control government and have very different views about what should be done. because of this, parses want to organize and coordinate but campaign finance laws but restraint of that. the laws were de
today. courtney reagan will be joining us with a preview in just a few minutes. then we'll bring you walmart's quarterly results the second they hit the tape. along with complete analysis and reaction from the street and, of course, you can't talk about the consumer without talking about energy prices. and rising gasoline costs at the pump, we've been watching everything that happens with oil prices moving higher. yesterday they actually sold off, but that is not much relief to those who have been paying higher price e at the pump for the last month. joining us in the next hour, oil man boone pickens. so the economy is at the top of the hour. andrew will get you up to speed on the day's other headlines. >> hedge fund manager david einhorn is taking his apple campaign directly to shareholders. he's going to be hosting a conference call today to argue the merits of distributing hedging preferred stock which, of course, is what this big debate is about. einhorn is battling and seeking an injunction next week to abolish a system for issuing preferred stock. i got a letter overnight from
street or for the u.s. a main street brand. but they have this great digital fashion thing going on. it's a gimmicky partnership with google. you see these reports about google getting the lines between fashion and retail and tech are all blurring. >> they are, indeed. so on today's show, there's a -- here is another taster. in china, it's the first trading day market in the new year of the snake. so will it be new year old problems? up next from hong kong, we'll have the latest analysis. >> did you just slither? also, the final week of campaigning in italy ahead of the general elections. we will be live in milan throughout the morning for a roundup of the candidates policies and pit falls. julia will join us for that. >>> and hear state from the finance ministers. we have a roundup of the g-20 meeting in moscow. >> and london fashion week is under way and international expansion seems to be the latest trend. we'll hear from top designers who are putting their foot forward on the global runway. >>> first, standard & poors says it wants more time to gauge shinzo abe's rating policies. s&
. howard, will you dot honors? [applause] >> u.s. senator, vice president of the united states, nobel peace prize recipient, as cor winner, best selling author, any one of these superlatives alone would be enough to suggest that our next speaker is a force with which to be reckoned, but when combined into one individual, it is evident that al gore is a force of nature. he is always been on the leading edge of promoting the internet as a tool for greater communication, of climate change as one of the greatest perils of our time, and in his latest book, "the future," of the key medical technological, and philosophical drivers checking our world. ever the big picture thinker, al gore explores how we may harness these epic change agents for the good. although his public professionalized had it not been without controversy, his record of accomplishments speak to the life lived on the precipice of passion, purpose, and possibility. on behalf of the savannah book festival, it is by great honor to introduce to all of you al gore. [applause] [cheers and applause] >> thank you very much, thank you. t
us on monday. have a great weekend. "squawk on the street" starts right now. >>> we have breaking news on this jobs friday. welcome to "squawk on the street." i'm melissa lee, with carl quintanilla and david faber. we're closing in on 14,000. a leg higher in futures just moments ago. the dow looking at 112 points at the open. the s&p 500 looking at about 11 at the open. of course, this is after the best month for january, since january of 1987. as for the picture over in europe, taking the lead from here in the united states in terms of gains, we do see the cap up by 1.3%, and the dax in germany up .6 of 1%. in asia, the real star is the nikkei, embarking on 12-week winning streak with the yen weakening down to 92 versus the u.s. dollar. of course, the road map here starts with the all-important jobs report. and the dow nearing 14,000. the u.s. adding 157,000 jobs in january with the unemployment rate ticking up to 7.9%, despite the partisan nonpayroll jobs. a large part of the jobs coming in the final months of the year. >> we want to take a closer look at what the jobs number sa
the potential to carry out tests using a method that would make a nuclear weapon extremely effective. >> in the past, the nuclear bombs dropped on hiroshima and nagasaki were made of plutonium. weighed 13 tons and it resulted in a huge number of casualties. we believe the advanced weapons from the north might have several times more impact and could almost destroy an entire city. >> a new report by doctors without borders says half of the 220,000 syrian deputies in lebanon are not receiving adequate medical care. it says the situation has deteriorated over the last six months. now this live report from club anon. they were meant to be refugee camps, but are they providing any real refuge for the syrians escaping the fighting? >> the report says, basically, that the refugees are living in subhuman conditions. they don't have adequate shelter or access to medical care. we are the valid at one of the u.n. centers where the refugees come to register their names. it's a very important process. you can see them lining up. they come with their whole family and each member of the family has
. michelle caruso cabrera is there on scene. she's going to join us with more and what the means for carnival and the broader cruise industry overall. >>> we are tracking the markets this morning. a lot of excitement fueled in large part by deal activities. in the last few days aloep, we heard berkshire hathway is buying heinz for $3 billion. and comcast announcing a $16.7 deal to buy out ge's remaining stake in cnbc parent nbc universal. warn buffett on "squawk box" yesterday. >> i'm ready for on the another element. please, if you see any walking by, please call me. >> how much do you have on hand, cash deal? >> year en, we have about 47 billion of cash. but we always like to keep and we will keep around 20 billion. so you might say the excess cash at year-end was about $27 billion. >> we will talk more about animal spirits this morning. among our guests is sandra o'neal's jimmy dunn, robert caplan, cantor fitzgerald's bill nichols and former etrade ceo mitch caplin. plus, kelly evans will be joining us from some of the headlines out of that gathering. but the story out of russia this morni
much for joining us this morning. >> thank you. >> and thank you, everybody, for joining us this morning. enjoy that long weekend. we will see you back here on tuesday. right now, it's time for squawk on the street. >> welcome, live from the new york stock exchange. jim cramer is off today. the u.s. session here, we just had empire state manufacturing crossing, turning positive for the first time since july. we see futures hugging the flat line pretty much. the s&p with a bias towards the green. in europe, the d-20 meeting is underway in moscow. your mixed bag as we have spain in the negative. japan's nikkei, that's one that's notable, dropping as yen strengthen for the fourth straight session. hang seng is wup and kospi is flat. >> our road map begins with a valentine that carl ichichan. it's the latest sell in the battle of the billionaires as the shorts feel the squeeze. >> apple emerges as the battleground stock with the likes of einhorn and tsiros and low, getting out. >> they are off the boat. passengers on the carnival triumph finally disembarked in mobile, alabama, b
important to be here? why couldn't you do what you wanted to -- i mean, it's good for us, but why is it good for you? >> i think because here in the state states, something missing in europe is this ecosystem. we're talking about having the academy awards working hand in hand with venture capitalists, with the entrepreneur, with scientists, researchers, in order to innovate nap's really something that's missing. and, you know, replicating silicon valley is something that many, many countries have tried to do, right? the french president in the '60s tripe tried to replicate something, a place with similar weather in southern france, but it didn't work out. >> isn't there a case, though, that you could in a world there where there's a lot of virtual resource where is you may have people who are writing code for you in india or romania and you -- >> or italy. >> or italy. >> a lot of companies whose marketing and management are here while their developing centers are in italy. and i'm talking about a good friend, for example, an amazing association of entrepreneurs called mind bridge. that's th
>>> welcome back. our guest host told us earlier, there's a list of stocks that will double -- you know, stocks that go up, and then time. everybody's going to double eventually, i would imagine, right? when are these going to double? >> if you go back to the nifty fifty of 1973, they were two times erjs. 1999 it didn't double. the economies will grow on a global basis, 3% plus inflation. >> how many have you got? >> i picked ten in baron's, those are available if anybody wants to go on the roundtable. two that are new that weren't there, one is a company that just announced last night the results, gencorp, they bought rocket dyne, and they're closing in on that. and that business, the basic manufacturing business which has short-term hiccups will earn 3 cents or 4 cents in the next few years. significant acreage in an area called sacramento, and real estate is booming. second one is a simple one, that's called legg mason which i announced yesterday. legg mason, 164 million shares, down to 128. every day they announce two-thirds of the cash flow is going to buy back stock. great ca
guidance seriously. i want to tush to the longer-term thing themes that got us here. it can't turn on a dime. it might feel like it could, but i want to turn to themes that don't have me suggesting go 100% like i heard some to say or end of the world, and i'm not going to tell you to be a traitor. i've worked hard on the show to get away from being trading, the risk on, risk off garbage. that you need to dump everything because it's thursday, the vast majority of you are not traders and you deserve not to be whipped. you deserve better than that. let's start with my favorite theme, housing. we developed an unbelievably negative attitude on housing. worries about home builder optimism and allegedly a terrible quarter from toll brothers. first of all it wasn't a negative conference call. the business stronger than it was in years. 49% increase in orders and the backlog is that really bad? many areas across the country, toll brothers selling out developments faster than it ever has. and how to people miss this stuff? i have to belief traders only read the headline numbers and freaked
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